Measuring currents in the SolidShore project

LIAE, in collaboration with Tallinn University of Technology, deployed 9 Hydromast current meters and an acoustic Doppler current velocity meter near Skulte harbour in Zvejniekciems in early August to obtain more information on coastal currents and water mass movements.

Measuring currents in the SolidShore project

LIAE, in collaboration with Tallinn University of Technology, deployed 9 Hydromast current meters and an acoustic Doppler current velocity meter near Skulte harbour in Zvejniekciems in early August to obtain more information on coastal currents and water mass movements. All nine current meters simultaneously measured the speed and direction of water flow, as well as water pressure. In parallel, the acoustic Doppler meter also measured current speed and direction.

The Hydromast meters have been developed at Tallinn University of Technology as a new method to measure the movement of near-bottom layer currents and analyse shallow water waves. The study will calibrate the wave model in the Eastern part of the Gulf of Riga and improve the sediment flux model. This will help predict the directions and extent of coastal sand movements more accurately, which will allow for prediction of areas of coastal erosion and accumulation. Such a study will allow more accurate predictions of the impact of climate change on the shallow sea area. The scientific equipment was deployed on a 20×20m aluminium frame 500m from the shore at a depth of 3m and was kept at sea for 5 weeks.

The experiment was carried out within the Baltic Sea Research Program project EMP 480 “Solutions to current and future problems on natural and constructed shorelines, eastern Baltic Sea (SolidShore)”. In the picture you can see that at the time of removal of the meters, overgrowth (barnacles) and rusting of the frame had already occurred within 5 weeks.

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